Thursday Doors: Fort Kochi 2

As promised, I’m back again with my second lot of doors from Fort Kochi, an island in Kerala (a state in the South of India) which was gifted to the Portuguese by the King of Kochi in 1503 after the Portuguese forces helped him fight the Samoothri, the monarch of Calicut (another district in Kerala). It remained under the control of the Portuguese for 160 years, after which it was captured by the Dutch in 1683. The British overthrew the Dutch in 1795 after 112 years. As a result of it passing so many hands, the influence of Portuguese, Dutch and British architecture on the buildings and homes in this area is unmistakable.

The picture below is the Church of St Francis, where the Portuguese explorer, Vasco Da Gama was buried. He is revered as he is the first person to find out a sea route from Europe to the South of India. This route was used to trade in spices, cotton, coffee and tea.

Below is one of the many homes on Wellingdon Island which lie deserted. They once belonged to the British but are now the property of the Government. The houses were in use when the port functioned from Fort Kochi- for official purposes or as residential quarters for the Navy officers. But in 2011, when the port moved from Fort Kochi, these houses were abandoned.

The below is another door I found very interesting.

I’m not sure how this came about- a tree has its roots growing over what was once a compound wall, the wooden door is rotting, and a gaping hole in the form of an arch shows the grounds inside.

And last for this week, after dead and deserted doors, is this chic, white door that serves no purpose other than ornamentation.

The door to a boutique on the island is locked and does not serve the purpose. The entrance to the shop is through a door next to it.

That’s all the doors from my side this week. I’m linking this post to Dan’s ‘Thursday Doors’ post for the week where you can see beautiful doors from all over the world.

Last, but not least I leave you with this door quote-

Bye, until next week.

Cheers,

Copyright@smithavishwanathsblog.com. All Rights Reserved.

13 responses to “Thursday Doors: Fort Kochi 2”

  1. wrookieschu Avatar

    I love the door to the church!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Thank you for visiting and writing back. Yes,there is something lovely about the dimensions of the church door.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. wrookieschu Avatar

        You’re welcome ☺️

        Like

  2. boundlessblessingsblog Avatar

    Interesting history about these beautiful doors Smitha. Such a beautiful post

    Like

  3. Cheryl, Gulf Coast Poet Avatar

    An interesting post, Smitha! I learned a bit of history and enjoyed your lovely photos! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Thanks so much, Cheryl. I love knowing about the history of places because it reflects on the present- culture and the ways of life of the people there. Thanks to all the varying external influences on Fort Kochi, the place has a very different,fun vibe. I’m glad you enjoyed the history and the photos 🙂❤️

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Darlene Avatar

    I love your colection of doors here. Old doors have a fascination with me as I wonder what stories and secrets they hold.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Thank you, Darlene. I’m so glad you like old doors too…there’s something so beautiful about them.
      Your line about the ‘stories they hold’ set me thinking too🙂. There are stories about the abandoned homes on Willingdon Island being haunted.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Toonsarah Avatar

    Those ruins on Wellingdon Island are very photogenic, even while it is a shame to see houses unused and unloved like that. I love your quote at the end – spot on, and the opposite is also true.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      I’m so glad you found them eye-catching too, Sarah. It is a shame to see homes left like that…the sad part is there are so many such homes on Willingdon. There are talks to protect some of the places on the island as heritage sites and renovate some of the old homes. I hope it moves past talks though.
      ‘Closed minds lead to closed doors’ – perfectly said😊.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. robbiesinspiration Avatar

    Hi Smitha, these are very interesting doors and I enjoyed the history. Vasco de Gama is also credited with discovering the Cape of Good Hope in the Western Cape of South Africa. There is a cross erected to him there as a tribute.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Hi Robbie, I’m very glad you enjoyed the history behind the place. How interesting that Vasco de Gama discovered Cape of Good Hope too and he is remembered in S.Africa too. He must have found it on the way here:). Was S.Africa also ruled by the Portuguese then?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. robbiesinspiration Avatar

        Hi Smitha, Vasco de Gama did attempt to start a trading station in the Cape as a stopping point for ships travelling to the east. It was colonized by the Dutch East India Company in 1652. So the Cape was under Dutch rule and then British rule.

        Like

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