Thursday Doors: Fort Kochi III

Last week, I could not participate in the ‘Thursday Doors’ as I was stuck in the hospital. And though, after seeing my blood pressure at 180/110, the doctor had repeated for the nth time, that it was a minor procedure, I wondered if I would get out to share another post. I’m not exaggerating. I’m just saying, after being given general anaesthesia, do you really know if you’ll wake up? If you do wake up, yayy! If you don’t then, well, that’s it, right?

Anyway, I’m happy to be back and to be able to share the remaining of my Fort Kochi doors. Today’s doors are unlike the ruins I shared the week before last.

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I kind of liked the contrasting colours here- the green against the blue and the red on the walls



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Here’s a door to a window- again, I loved the colours

Here are some more doors and actually the last of my Fort Kochi collection. The European (Portuguese, Dutch and British) influence on the island in Kerala, India, is obvious from these doors.

Lastly, here is the door to the ward, I was put in, last week. We hadn’t booked a room in advance (I had no idea we had to do that). So, on the date of the surgery, we were told that there was a waiting list for single rooms and two of the floors in the hospital had covid patients. Like a lamb, I followed the nurse into a dimly lit room. She pointed to a bed in the corner. As there were no sheets on it, I sat on a vacant chair beside the bed. Two ward boys came in to put sheets on the bed and profusely apologized for not putting it in time and told me “Ma’am if you need anything, please ring the bell.” I nodded, confused with the hotel-like service at the hospital. All I wanted, was to get out as soon as possible. I sat at the edge of the freshly made bed, waiting for my husband to come in. One step in and turning around, he asked me to step out. I did, without question- I tend to be very docile when I am in ‘patient’ mode.

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Before leaving for the twin-sharing room for which the hospital had charged us but had put me in the room for the needy, I took a picture of this door to the ward as a reminder of my experience at this well-known hospital in Mumbai.

I’m linking this post to Dan’s Thursday Doors challenge.

Copyright@smithavpennings.com.

18 responses to “Thursday Doors: Fort Kochi III”

  1. I. J. Khanewala Avatar

    Interesting to see that hospital door. An experience I would like to avoid.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Definitely. I was okay because all I wanted was to be well. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Miriam Hurdle Avatar

    Sorry about your 180/110 blood pressure, Smitha. What a coincidence, I had a high fever, high blood pressure, and a rash from an allergic reaction this weekend. Just went to Urgent Care. I’m forgetful about taking my blood pressure meds.
    This is new to me seeing a hospital door like yours with labels. That’s a lot of work to label the hospital rooms, the least to say. Hope you’ve gotten better by now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      I have no idea how my pressure shot up, Miriam. It must have been the anxiety of the surgery and the results. But, I’m ok now.
      I hope you’re much better now. It’s scary when the body acts up. You realize how little control you really have on your own body. Do take care of yourself.
      I was surprised to see the label on the door as well. And even more surprises that they charged us exorbitant fees and thought they could get away by putting me in this ward, as mine was an outpatient treatment. We have raised a complaint. And thank you for asking. I am much better now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Miriam Hurdle Avatar

        I have what the doctor said, “white coat syndrome.” My blood pressure is usually higher at the doctor’s office. I went to the urgent care on Saturday. I had 172/82. When I got home, it was 143/78. It doesn’t matter what I tell myself. As you said we have so little control on our body. I just have to remember taking my medication. You take care of yourself also, Smitha!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Smitha V Avatar

          I had no idea there was something like that…thanks Miriam for letting me know. I googled it up and have now decided to monitor my pressure regularly.
          I just ordered your book. Waiting to read it. Hugs.

          Like

          1. Miriam Hurdle Avatar

            I just went to the doctor’s office. My pressure was high. I have to take medication regularly. I forget to do most of the time. I need to set the alarm for reminder.
            Then you for ordering my book, Smitha.

            Like

  3. lynnfay73 Avatar

    I love your door posts. Some of my favorites. Wow, hospitals are sure different there. I think your procedure likely would have been done outpatient here, but definitely no hotel feel to it. Seems kind of homey, though they weren’t ready for you. Neat seeing how different things are in other places.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      I finally finished my stash of door pictures. Now, I’ll need to find new doors :). I’m so glad you enjoy these posts- it’s fun looking for interesting doors when I travel.
      Yes, Lynn, mine was an outpatient procedure but I was shocked to see them charge premium rates and give me a room for the needy. I meant ‘hotel’ because they kept addressing me as ‘Ma’am’ and telling me how the limited privileges in the room had to be accessed- I suppose it was because they believed I did not belong there.
      This was my first time in Mumbai, so I wasn’t sure how things worked here. Just checked with a friend of mine today and was told that this must have been a blunder by the administration.
      🙂 it is pretty interesting seeing how hospitals function so differently everywhere. My next post might just be with questions on hospital practices elsewhere- I was startled with the way things were done in this hospital.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Timothy Avatar

    Glad you are doing better. Loved the bookseller’s door.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. robbiesinspiration Avatar

    Hi Smitha, you have to book private rooms in hospitals here too. I am very well versed on hospital procedures. There was a time when every nurse in the pediatric ward knew my name and that of my sons. I am glad it’s over and you’ve come through it fine.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      Hi Robbie, do you need to book it in advance? I was surprised by so many things at the hospital here- I just checked with a friend whose family is part of the medical fraternity, to understand if that’s how it’s done in India. In Dubai, given the much smaller size of the population, it’s easier to get a room.
      I can only imagine how it must have been for you, when the children were young- it’s hard to forget ‘hospital’ related memories.
      I’m glad too, Robbie. Thank you for checking on me and sharing your personal experience regarding the issue- it gave me courage. XXX

      Like

      1. robbiesinspiration Avatar

        Hi Smitha, for operations we are able to book in advance. Hospitalizations due to unexpected illnesses were always potluck but we usually got a private room on the second day if there were one on the first day

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Teagan Riordain Geneviene Avatar

    Dear Smitha, this post goes so much deeper than what was at first apparent. Thank you for sharing it. I know that it can take weeks for general anesthesia to completely get out of your system. Please be patient and good to yourself.
    These doors were particularly interesting to me because one of my works in progress is set in India of the late 1800s. You’ve given me starting points for additional research, like Fort Koshi.
    Wishing you wellness. Hugs on the wing.

    Like

  7. Dan Antion Avatar

    I really like the featured door, and the arched blue door in the larger gallery. You had an interesting experience. Sometimes, it’s good to stop and think about those, and to remember. Thanks for sharing it with us and for including the door. I hope the procedure went well and you are feeling better now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Smitha V Avatar

      I was surprised to find so many of these very pretty, foreign looking doors in Fort Kochi. There were more, but, unfortunately, I could not take a picture of them as it began to rain.
      Thank you for checking out the doors. I’m very glad you liked them. The procedure went well, by God’s grace and I’m feeling much better, thank you. It is an experience I don’t think I will forget; this door picture will be a reminder :).

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dan Antion Avatar

        I’m glad to hear that it went well.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Smitha V Avatar

          Thank you, Dan.

          Liked by 1 person

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